A person in a orange safety slicker and navy blue pants sweeps with a broom around concrete structures and industrial equipment

How King County businesses help protect public health & the environment through our Industrial Waste program

Staff at our King County wastewater treatment plants do an excellent job of cleaning wastewater, but not all types of waste can be filtered out during the treatment process. Our Industrial Waste Program is in charge of preventing pollution from entering the wastewater system in the first place. That’s also where local business can make…

A woman wastewater operator in a orange safety shirt, mask, gloves and googles, holds up water samples

Wastewater could be a great career for you & we will PAY & train you to find out!

Operators work hands-on, out at our treatment plants Operators watch over large and complex industrial equipment and the flows going through them – from both on-the-ground and from computer monitoring systems. They check readings and take water samples to make sure things are running smoothly – troubleshooting when necessary. They often work as part of…

City Soil Farm: A Record Year for White Center Food Bank Donations

City Soil Farm, located at King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) South Plant is a small farm that produces food for the community and demonstrates the benefits of turning wastewater into valuable resources such as recycled water and Class A biosolids. City Soil is a place where the hard work of staff and volunteers means…

Well KEPT youth employees wear masks and safety vest as they help build a trail detour

Building a path for the future during a challenging time

At King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD), we consider it a win whenever we can partner with local agencies and organizations to accomplish a goal. In 2021, WTD’s partners at City of Bellevue Parks navigated the ongoing pandemic to create a big win for trail users and youth employment. WTD’s Coal Creek Sewer Upgrade Project…

People planting plants in a rain garden lined with mulch

WaterWorks grants $5 million to community water quality improvement projects for 2022-23

Sixty-eight projects aimed at protecting and improving regional water quality will be launched in the new year, thanks to funding through King County’s WaterWorks Grant Program. The King County Council recently passed an ordinance approving the funding. The projects include a variety of approaches, including restoring stream and riverbanks, installing rain gardens, educating students and teachers,…

Students in the Clean Water Ambassador teen intern program stand in front of a building with masks on

Wastewater education team wins award for inclusive youth employment

King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) was presented with the Youth Employer of the Year Award from the Governor’s Committee on Disability Issues and Employment (GCDE) on October 26, 2021. This award recognizes employers who make efforts toward inclusion of people with disabilities in employment. In a virtual celebration, WTD staff members Kristin Covey and…

Green stormwater infrastructure & CSOs: In-depth media coverage

King County is working to control all our combined sewer overflows (CSOs) through several strategies. One way we are reducing CSOs is through natural drainage solutions, also known as green stormwater infrastructure (GSI), which use plants, trees, and soil to soak up the rain.These solutions help our neighborhoods manage stormwater naturally and on-site, and compliment…

A rain garden showing a shallow depression in the ground, with mulch, rocks, and plants

Celebrating RainWise pollution prevention milestones in the King County basin

As the days get shorter and we anticipate more rain in our forecast, we are celebrating a timely milestone—we just mailed our 1,000th RainWise rebate check in one of the eligible combined sewer overflow basins! Our utility strives to prevent pollution from entering our local waterways, and one way we are doing this is through…

A wastewater operator sits facing away from us, in front of multiple computer screens that help monitor the treatment plant processes

As rainy weather approaches, we are on the job 24/7

Our crews are on the job 24/7, 365 days a year to ensure the region’s wastewater treatment service – and that remains true as we move into the rainy season. Workers are ready to respond around the clock and work hard to be well-prepared for stormy weather or an emergency. To make sure we’re ready…