Well KEPT youth employees wear masks and safety vest as they help build a trail detour

Building a path for the future during a challenging time

At King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD), we consider it a win whenever we can partner with local agencies and organizations to accomplish a goal. In 2021, WTD’s partners at City of Bellevue Parks navigated the ongoing pandemic to create a big win for trail users and youth employment. WTD’s Coal Creek Sewer Upgrade Project…

People planting plants in a rain garden lined with mulch

WaterWorks grants $5 million to community water quality improvement projects for 2022-23

Sixty-eight projects aimed at protecting and improving regional water quality will be launched in the new year, thanks to funding through King County’s WaterWorks Grant Program. The King County Council recently passed an ordinance approving the funding. The projects include a variety of approaches, including restoring stream and riverbanks, installing rain gardens, educating students and teachers,…

Students in the Clean Water Ambassador teen intern program stand in front of a building with masks on

Wastewater education team wins award for inclusive youth employment

King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) was presented with the Youth Employer of the Year Award from the Governor’s Committee on Disability Issues and Employment (GCDE) on October 26, 2021. This award recognizes employers who make efforts toward inclusion of people with disabilities in employment. In a virtual celebration, WTD staff members Kristin Covey and…

Green stormwater infrastructure & CSOs: In-depth media coverage

King County is working to control all our combined sewer overflows (CSOs) through several strategies. One way we are reducing CSOs is through natural drainage solutions, also known as green stormwater infrastructure (GSI), which use plants, trees, and soil to soak up the rain.These solutions help our neighborhoods manage stormwater naturally and on-site, and compliment…

A rain garden showing a shallow depression in the ground, with mulch, rocks, and plants

Celebrating RainWise pollution prevention milestones in the King County basin

As the days get shorter and we anticipate more rain in our forecast, we are celebrating a timely milestone—we just mailed our 1,000th RainWise rebate check in one of the eligible combined sewer overflow basins! Our utility strives to prevent pollution from entering our local waterways, and one way we are doing this is through…

Banner with a photo of Lake WA and Mt Rainier and text that says construction in Mercer Island & Bellevue to start early 2022

Major construction in Mercer Island & Bellevue to start early next year

Our relationship to water is what makes this region special.  King County is a partner in this relationship. Regional wastewater treatment plays a key role in keeping our rivers, lakes, streams, and the Puget Sound clean for people and aquatic life. We manage a big regional wastewater system that needs regular inspection, maintenance, and upgrades…

Interns discussing environmental monitoring at Mini Mart City

Clean Water Interns & Accessibility

Since 2016, our utility’s education team has partnered with the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust to lead the Clean Water Ambassador youth internship program. This summer the program returned as a hybrid experience, online learning mixed with in-person field trips, to learn about water systems, sustainability, watershed ecology, climate change and ways to take action…

Green roof at Sunset Pump Station

Making projects sustainable, resilient, and equitable

King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) is being recognized for its commitment to sustainable communities and the environment. WTD’s Sunset / Heathfield Pump Stations and force main upgrade project was awarded an Envision® Silver Award this month for project sustainability. This is the second Envision-certified project for the region’s wastewater utility. In 2018, King County’s…

Savannah sparrows depend on healthy grasslands and meadows for food and places to raise their young.

Brightwater’s meadows grow greener

The Brightwater Trails area in Woodinville has been popular for families, dog walkers, birders, and runners since it opened. Three miles of trails have connected people to nature and art for over 10 years. This year, the trails provided a welcome breath of fresh air for people looking to get some socially distanced exercise outside.…