collage of all the images in this slideshow

UPDATED: We’re working to improve power supply quality at West Point Treatment Plant to continue our clean-water mission

Power disruptions during heavy rainfall As a clean water agency, our mission is to protect public health and the environment. We work 24/7 to serve over 1.8 million residents and clean about 190 million gallons of water per day. Even in massive rainstorms that generate more volume than the system can handle, we feel bypass…

Finding a job that fits you, pays well AND is meaningful is amazing. If you like freedom and change you might like operating a wastewater treatment plant. We’ll help you find out – and pay to train you.

Our business is unconventional – and that works for a lot of our employees We get it. Any of us who work here at King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have been asked what we do for a living – and we’ve seen the smirks and heard the giggles when we explain we help run…

Wastewater workers prepare for rainy weather

As rainy weather approaches, we are on the job 24/7

As we move into the rainy season, our crews are on the job 24/7 to ensure the region’s wastewater treatment service is well-prepared for an emergency or stormy weather. To make sure we’re ready for what wet weather can bring, we have inspected and replaced equipment, updated control systems and increased training of treatment plant…

King County South Treatment Plant

Utility of the Future Today & awards for outstanding performance

King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) has received national recognition as a Utility of the Future Today for its beneficial use of Loop® biosolids. WTD is one of 65 water utilities being recognized for transformational work in community engagement, watershed stewardship, and recovery of resources such as water, energy, and nutrients. The Utility of the Future…

stainless steel scrubbers

The case of the metal strands – teamwork leads to the source of treatment system damage

When wastewater comes into the Carnation Wastewater Treatment Plant, it first passes through a process that removes larger particles like trash and grit from the water. Next, the water flows through a process that involves tanks containing membranes. These membranes are fine filters (like spaghetti) that only allow water molecules to flow through. When staff…

wastewater operators

Our operators keep treating wastewater and protecting public health

King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) treats wastewater from people and businesses to protect people’s health and the environment. We operate three regional treatment plants, two local treatment plants, and four wet weather treatment plants. In 2018, we treated an average of 175 million gallons of sewage every day. Our operations staff (Ops) are as vital to the…

King County’s Georgetown Wet Weather Treatment Station celebrates Platinum Achievement Award for Sustainability

King County’s Georgetown Wet Weather Treatment Station (WWTS) has earned the coveted “Platinum” rating from the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure’s Envision rating system. This is the first Platinum-awarded Envision project in Washington and recognizes the County’s commitment to sustainable communities and the environment. The Georgetown WWTS project is under construction in Seattle’s Georgetown neighborhood and…