People planting plants in a rain garden lined with mulch

WaterWorks grants $5 million to community water quality improvement projects for 2022-23

Sixty-eight projects aimed at protecting and improving regional water quality will be launched in the new year, thanks to funding through King County’s WaterWorks Grant Program. The King County Council recently passed an ordinance approving the funding. The projects include a variety of approaches, including restoring stream and riverbanks, installing rain gardens, educating students and teachers,…

Green stormwater infrastructure & CSOs: In-depth media coverage

King County is working to control all our combined sewer overflows (CSOs) through several strategies. One way we are reducing CSOs is through natural drainage solutions, also known as green stormwater infrastructure (GSI), which use plants, trees, and soil to soak up the rain.These solutions help our neighborhoods manage stormwater naturally and on-site, and compliment…

CitySoil Farm harvest for 2020

Helping Feed Communities in Need

CitySoil Farm at King County’s South Treatment Plant in Renton was able to donate 3,762 lbs. of fresh, culturally-relevant fruits and vegetables to the White Center Food Bank this year – even thought we had to cancel our in-person education programs and volunteers. In a typical year, our utility’s education team brings hundreds of students…

Farms in a typical year (left) and after the 2020 fires (right).

King County Loop® Biosolids Help Community Recover from Wildfires

In the summer of 2020, the tiny community of Mansfield, WA (population 343) found itself smack dab in the middle of several wildfires between July and September. The largest fire, the Pearl Hill Fire, got a few thousand yards from town. Some residents lost everything. The Seattle Times published a map showing fires surrounding Mansfield…

Local businesses recognized for 2019 environmental compliance

King County’s Industrial Waste Program recognized 59 local industrial facilities for their commitment to business practices that support the local economy while protecting regional water quality. Each year, the Industrial Waste Program, which operates as part of King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division, honors local facilities whose business practices contribute to regional pollution prevention goals. Gold…

Updating Industrial Waste Fee Structure: Next Steps – Fall 2018

The King County Industrial Waste (KCIW) program has been working on a proposal to update the structure of its fee system. Changes require a two-step decision-making process. First the King County Council considers updating the King County Code. Pending Council approval, the Department of Natural Resources and Parks develops a Public Rule. Thirty-year old fee…

Updating Industrial Waste Fee Structure: Surcharge Customers Fall 2018

Businesses that send “high strength” or concentrated organic wastewater to the sewer system pay more because it costs more to treat this wastewater. KCIW’s Surcharge Fee currently includes the costs for both treating concentrated “high-strength” waste at a treatment plant and the cost of compliance monitoring and administering the permit or authorization. Under a proposal…

Industrial Waste Fees for Surcharge Customers

Businesses that send “high strength” or concentrated organic wastewater to the sewer system pay more because it costs more to treat this wastewater. KCIW’s Surcharge Fee currently pays for both treating concentrated “high-strength” waste at a treatment plant and the cost of compliance monitoring and administering the permit or authorization. Under a proposal to update…