The Georgetown station as viewed from the intersection.

The first Envision Platinum sustainability award in the state

King County’s Georgetown Wet Weather Treatment Station (WWTS) earned the coveted “Platinum” designation from the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure’s Envision rating system. This is the first Platinum-awarded Envision project in Washington and recognizes the County’s commitment to sustainable communities and the environment. The Georgetown WWTS project in Seattle’s Georgetown neighborhood will treat up to 70…

Two men in hardhats and safety clothing stand smiling at the camera. A railing and trees are in the background.

If you live in the City of Carnation, do you know where water goes after you send it down the drain?

Unless you use a septic system, the water you send down the drain in the City of Carnation travels through pipes owned and maintained by the City of Carnation to King County’s Carnation Treatment Plant. At this plant, we process about 111,000 gallons of wastewater every day. After we treat the water, we release it…

City Soil Farm: A Record Year for White Center Food Bank Donations

City Soil Farm, located at King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) South Plant is a small farm that produces food for the community and demonstrates the benefits of turning wastewater into valuable resources such as recycled water and Class A biosolids. City Soil is a place where the hard work of staff and volunteers means…

People planting plants in a rain garden lined with mulch

WaterWorks grants $5 million to community water quality improvement projects for 2022-23

Sixty-eight projects aimed at protecting and improving regional water quality will be launched in the new year, thanks to funding through King County’s WaterWorks Grant Program. The King County Council recently passed an ordinance approving the funding. The projects include a variety of approaches, including restoring stream and riverbanks, installing rain gardens, educating students and teachers,…

Green stormwater infrastructure & CSOs: In-depth media coverage

King County is working to control all our combined sewer overflows (CSOs) through several strategies. One way we are reducing CSOs is through natural drainage solutions, also known as green stormwater infrastructure (GSI), which use plants, trees, and soil to soak up the rain.These solutions help our neighborhoods manage stormwater naturally and on-site, and compliment…

A rain garden showing a shallow depression in the ground, with mulch, rocks, and plants

Celebrating RainWise pollution prevention milestones in the King County basin

As the days get shorter and we anticipate more rain in our forecast, we are celebrating a timely milestone—we just mailed our 1,000th RainWise rebate check in one of the eligible combined sewer overflow basins! Our utility strives to prevent pollution from entering our local waterways, and one way we are doing this is through…

Puget Sound view from the SoundGuardian boat

Reducing nitrogen in Puget Sound where it matters

King County is committed to protecting water quality and reducing harm to fish and aquatic life in Puget Sound’s shallow bays caused by human sources of nitrogen. The Department of Natural Resources and Parks supports a science-based approach that capitalizes on innovation and technology and focuses public resources where they can make a real difference.…

Green roof at Sunset Pump Station

Making projects sustainable, resilient, and equitable

King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) is being recognized for its commitment to sustainable communities and the environment. WTD’s Sunset / Heathfield Pump Stations and force main upgrade project was awarded an Envision® Silver Award this month for project sustainability. This is the second Envision-certified project for the region’s wastewater utility. In 2018, King County’s…

Savannah sparrows depend on healthy grasslands and meadows for food and places to raise their young.

Brightwater’s meadows grow greener

The Brightwater Trails area in Woodinville has been popular for families, dog walkers, birders, and runners since it opened. Three miles of trails have connected people to nature and art for over 10 years. This year, the trails provided a welcome breath of fresh air for people looking to get some socially distanced exercise outside.…

Starting a decade of improvements at West Point Treatment Plant

Built in 1966, West Point Treatment Plant is the largest wastewater treatment plant by volume in Washington state, and the third largest by average daily flow on the West Coast. Like much of the King County wastewater system, it’s more than 55 years old and many of its components reach their “end of life” each…